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How to Avoid Bulky Legs From Bike Riding (Video)

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Lots of riders get big quads from cycling alone

Lots of riders get big quads from cycling alone

So you have a brand new bike with the best bike saddle bags and love riding it, but don’t love what it’s doing to your legs and thighs as much or the way your jeans aren’t fitting anymore?!

You are not alone or imagining it. Yes, bike riding can make your butt and thighs / legs and quads bigger – whether it be a result of temporary swelling, increased hunger (which leads to overeating and fat / weight gain), and if you ride your bike for exercise or for long periods of time, a higher likelihood of overdeveloped muscles.

Just take a look at many of the women who attend spinning classes (soul cycle or fly wheel), or amateur and professional road cyclists! Although they may not be obese, chances are their legs are a lot more muscular, developed or toned than you want yours to be (that is if you are reading this post… if not, ride on!).

Sure, a lot of these people work out and train their legs separately with heavy weights, but a good deal of them have built up their muscular quads solely from spinning without ever stepping foot in a gym!

So, you have every reason to be wary!

But that doesn’t mean you have to lock up your wheels and throw away the key. Believe it or not, it is totally possible to ride your bike without getting big, bulky thighs and quads – and today you’re in luck because I am going to give you the answers you have been searching all over the internet for.

If you want to know how to ride your bike without getting big, bulky legs and thighs / quads, there I reveal ten tips that you should follow when cycling in my video below).

If you follow my tips you can totally enjoy the freedom and joy of riding your bike without having to worry about it negatively affecting your physique (thigh width) and forcing you to buy a bigger pant size.

I specialize in helping women achieve lean, slim, svelte physiques that they find feminine and I’m happy to share how YOU can still maintain your body or body goals while experiencing one of the cheapest forms of transportation and greatest source of child like fun there is!

 

Accessories For Cyclist That Can Prevent Bicycle Accidents

When you are involved in a car and bicycle collision, the cyclist is very likely to incur serious injury. For that reason, it is all the more important the bicycle riders in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C., focus on preventing bicycle accidents and bicycle accident injuries before they ever get on their bike. Below are five bike accessories that can help to minimize bicycle accident injuries and lower the chances of a bike accident altogether. Read and learn what to do when getting involved on a dui crime in Texas.

  • A helmet. The single most important safety accessory you can have as a cyclist is a well-fitting helmet. Bike helmets significantly reduce the number and severity of head injuries during bicycle accidents – and safety advocates say that helmets save hundreds of lives each year.
  • A horn. Many bike accidents occur when a car does not see an approaching cyclist and either turns or pulls out in front of a biker. Having a loud horn attached to your handlebars can mean that if you are not seen, you are heard.
  • A mirror. Bikers can buy rear-view mirrors that attach to their handlebars or to their helmet, and newer cyclist mirror accessories even include sunglasses with a mirror on the inside. These mirrors can let you know what’s behind you and if an approaching car may not see you. Many bikers are hit by cars from behind, and a rearview mirror can prevent many of these accidents.
  • A headlight. Most states require bikers to use a headlight when riding at night – and with good reason. A headlight serves two distinct purposes: allowing the cyclist to see and allowing others to see the approaching cyclist.
  • A taillight. Just as a headlight allows a car to see you approaching from the front, a taillight allows cars behind you to see you from the back. A red flashing rear light is inexpensive and effective.
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